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Tonometry

 

Definition

Tonometry is a test to measure the pressure inside your eyes. The test is used to screen for glaucoma.

Alternative Names

Intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement; Glaucoma test

How the test is performed

There are several methods of testing for glaucoma.

The applanation method measures the force required to flatten a certain area of the cornea. A fine strip of paper stained with orange dye is touched to the side of the eye. The dye stains the front of the eye to help with the examination, then rinses out with tears. An anesthetic drop is also placed in the eye.

The slit-lamp is placed in front of you and you rest your chin and forehead on a support that keeps your head steady. The lamp is moved forward until the tonometer touches the cornea. The light is usually a blue circle. The health care provider looks through the eyepiece on the lamp and adjusts the tension on the tonometer. There is no discomfort associated with the test.

A slightly different method of applanation uses an object similar to pencil. Again, you are given numbing eye drops to prevent any discomfort. The device touches the outside of the eye and instantly records eye pressure.

The last method is the noncontact method (air puff). In this method, your chin rests on a padded stand. You stare straight into the examining device. The eye doctor shines a bright light into your eye to properly line up the instrument, and then delivers a brief puff of air at your eye. The machine measures eye pressure by looking at how the light reflections change as the air hits the eye.

How to prepare for the test

Remove contact lenses before the examination. The dye can permanently stain contact lenses.

Inform the health care provider if you have corneal ulcers and infections, an eye infection, if you are taking any drugs, or if you have a history of glaucoma in your family.

How the test will feel

If numbing eye drops were used, you should not have any pain. In the noncontact method, you may feel mild pressure on your eye.

Why the test is performed

People over age 40, especially African Americans, have the the highest risk for developing glaucoma. Regular eye exams can help detect glaucoma early, when it can usually be treated.

The test may also be done before and after eye surgery.

Normal Values

A normal result means your eye pressure is within the normal range. Normal eye pressure range is 10 - 21 mmHg.

Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

What abnormal results mean

Abnormal results may be due to:

  • Glaucoma
  • Hyphema
  • Trauma to the eye or head
What the risks are

If the applanation method is used, there is a small chance the cornea may be scratched (corneal abrasion). This will normally heal itself within a few days.


Review Date: 8/22/2008
Reviewed By: Paul B. Griggs, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
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