Printer Friendly VersionEmail A FriendAdd ThisIncrease Text SizeDecrease Text Size

Clubfoot repair - series

 

Normal anatomy

The normal position of the human foot is such that the sole of the foot is flat against the ground while walking. Clubfoot is a congenital abnormality in which the foot is adducted (angled inward). Correction of clubfoot is required for normal ambulation later in life.

Normal anatomy
Procedure, part 1

The newborn baby's deformed foot is initially treated with casts. The tendons, ligaments, and bones are still quite flexible and easier to reposition. The foot is stretched into a more normal position and a light-weight cast is applied to retain the corrected position. The cast will be removed every week or two so the foot can be further stretched into better position and maintained with a new cast. This serial casting is continued for three or more months and is successful in at least 50% of cases. If the casts do not provide enough correction of the clubfoot, surgery is considered.

Procedure, part 1
Procedure, part 2

The type and extent of surgery depends on the how severe the deformity is. The defect involves tight and short tendons around the foot and ankle. The surgery involves lengthening some tendons and shortening other tendons to place the bones and joints in normal positions. A cast is applied to the foot after surgery to maintain its position while it heals.

Procedure, part 2
Aftercare

The child will stay in the hospital for approximately two days after surgery. The foot will be casted and kept elevated, with ice packs used to reduce swelling and pain. Medications can be used for pain. The skin around the cast and the toes will be checked frequently for the first 48 hours to make sure that the circulation, movement, and feeling are maintained. Before leaving the hospital, the parent will be taught how to take care of the cast, which is usually left on for about three months. Skin irritations from the cast or incision infections may occur. Physical therapy is usually required after the cast is removed to strengthen the muscles in the repaired foot.

Aftercare

Review Date: 11/2/2009
Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2009 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
MAIMONIDES
MEDICAL CENTER


Home Page
Why Choose Us
Donations
Website Terms of Use
PATIENT
INFORMATION


Visitor & Patient Info
Patient Portal
We Speak Your Language
Patient Privacy
Contact Us
KEY
INFORMATION


Find a Physician
Medical Services
Maimonides In the News
Directions & Parking
FOR HEALTH
PROFESSIONALS


Medical Education
Career Opportunities
Nurses & Physicians
Staff Intranet Access
Maimonides Medical Center    |    4802 Tenth Avenue    |    Brooklyn, NY 11219    |    718.283.6000    |